Complications & Risks Of LASIK - Keratoconus

When a flap that is cut too deeply during LASIK or when the cornea initially was weakened as evidenced from cornea topography mapping prior to LASIK, it will lead to the keratoconus in patients. The occurrence of Keratoectasia is 0.04% - 0.6%.

The normal corneal surface is smooth and aspheric is round in the center, flattening towards its outer edges. Keratoconus occurs when the middle of the cornea thins and gradually bulges outward, forming a rounded cone shape. The abnormal curvature changes the cornea's refractive power producing moderate to severe irregular astigmatism and blurriness of vision. As the condition advances, scarring of the central cornea occurs.

In most cases, the cornea will stabilize after a few years without ever causing severe vision problems. Only a small percentage of patients with keratoconus may become intolerant to contact lenses, or find that scarring of the cornea has caused loss of vision.

Complications & Risks Of LASIK - Keratoconus

Reasons

Too much tissue is removed from the cornea during surgery or when the cornea initially was weakened as evidenced from cornea topography mapping prior to LASIK.

Treatment

  • Patients with keratoconus see best with rigid contact lenses since these lenses provide a clear surface in front of the cornea allowing the light rays to be projected clearly to the retina.
  • Only a small percentage of patients with keratoconus may become intolerant to contact lenses, or find that scarring of the cornea has caused loss of vision. In this situation, a corneal transplant is an option that can result in improved vision.